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Women in sex suits

Duration: 10min 43sec Views: 1493 Submitted: 22.03.2021
Category: Mature
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This product is usually dispatched within 3 days. Since the dawn of western fashion in the Middle Ages, women's dress has never stopped evolving, yet menswear has seen far fewer style revolutions. At the centre of the male wardrobe is the suit: relatively unchanged since the 17th century, its cut and cloth suggest athleticism, seriousness, sexuality and strength — qualities which contrasted with the perceived superficiality and frivolity of female dress, and eventually led to the adoption of the suit into the female wardrobe where it remains to this day. In Sex and Suits brilliant essayist and art critic Anne Hollander charts the development of men's and women's fashion from their divergence in the medieval period to their convergence through to the late 20th century.

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From an art historian admired for her brilliance and wit, a provocative argument for the value of modern fashion as sexual expression, with the tailored suit as its strongest example. Dress was equally showy for men and women until the late eighteenth century, when natural simplicity and understatement on the model of the Classical Greek nude became fashionable, but for men's clothes only. After that, obvious sexual display in dress was left to women - and it came to seem both shameful and esthetically inferior by comparison, despite its variety. Hollander shows how modern women adapted men's tailoring to their richer scheme of display, making suits do for women what they had long done for men: show their sexuality to be central, serious and interesting, rather than irrational, shallow and dangerous. She shows us, too, how men - now that women have adopted every element of male style - are recapturing the color and ornament they long found taboo, without giving up the potent beauty of tailored suits, which women have made universal.